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Securing SAP Clouds: Application Security

By Adrian Lane
This post will discuss the foundational elements of an application security program for SAP HCP deployments. Without direct responsibility for management of hardware and physical networks you lose the traditional security data capture points for traffic analysis and firewall technologies. The net result is that, whether on PaaS or IaaS, your application security program becomes more important than ever as what you have control over. Yes, SAP provides some network monitoring and DDoS services, but your options are are limited, they don’t share much data, and what they monitor is not tailored to your applications or requirements. Any application

Securing SAP Clouds: Architecture and Operations

By Adrian Lane
This post will discuss several keys differences in application architecture and operations – with a direct impact on security – which you need to reconsider when migrating to cloud services. These are the areas which make operations easier and security better. As companies move large business-critical applications to the cloud, they typically do it backwards. Most people we speak with, to start getting familiar with the cloud, opt for cheap storage. Once a toe is in the water they place some development, testing, and failover servers in the cloud to backstop on-premise systems. These ar less critical than production servers, where firms

Tidal Forces: Endpoints Are Different—More Secure, and Less Open

By Rich
This is the second post in the Tidal Forces series. The introduction is available.. Computers aren’t computers any more. Call it a personal computer. A laptop, desktop, workstation, PC, or Mac. Whatever configuration we’re dealing with, and whatever we call it, much of the practice of information security focuses on keeping the devices we place in our users’ hands safe. They are the boon and bane of information technology – forcing us to find a delicate balance between safety, security, compliance, and productivity. Lock them down too much and people can’t get things done – they will find an

Secure Networking in the Cloud Age: Use Cases

By Mike Rothman
As we wrap up our series on secure networking in the cloud era, we have covered the requirements and migration considerations for this new network architecture – highlighting increased flexibility for configuration, scaling, and security services. In a technology environment which can change as quickly as a developer hitting ‘commit’ for a new feature, infrastructure needs to keep pace, and that is not something most enterprises can or should build themselves. One of the cornerstones of this approach to building networks is considering the specific requirements of the site, users, and applications, when deciding whether to buy or build the underlying

Network Security in the Cloud Age: Requirements and Migration

By Mike Rothman
As we noted in our introductory post for this Network Security in the Cloud Age series, everything changes, and technology is undergoing the most radical change and disruption since… well, ever. We’re not kidding – check out our Tidal Forces post for the rundown. This disruption will have significant ramifications for how we build and manage networks. Let’s work through the requirements for this network of the future, and then provide some perspective on how you can and should migrate to the new network architecture. At the highest level, the main distinction in building networks in the Cloud Age

Assembling A Container Security Program [New Paper]

By Adrian Lane
We are pleased to launch our latest research paper, on Docker security: Assembling a Container Security Program. Containers are now such integral elements of software delivery that enterprises are demanding security in and around containers. And it’s no coincidence that Docker has recently added a variety of security capabilities to its offerings, but they are only a small subset of what customers need. During our research we learned many things, including that: Containers are no longer a hypothetical topic for discussion among security practitioners. Today Development and Operations teams need a handle on what is being done, and how

Network Security in the Cloud Age: Everything Changes

By Mike Rothman
We have spent a lot of time discussing the disruptive impact of the cloud and mobility on… pretty much everything. If you need a reminder, check out our Inflection paper, which lays out how we (correctly, in hindsight) saw the coming tectonic shifts in the computing landscape. Rich is updating that research now, so you can check out his first post, where he discusses the trends which threaten promise to upend everything we know about security: Tidal Forces. To summarize, cloud computing and mobility disrupt the status quo by abstracting and automating huge portions of technology infrastructure – basically replacing corporate

Tidal Forces: The Trends Tearing Apart Security As We Know It

By Rich
Imagine a black hole suddenly appearing in the solar system – gravity instantly warping space and time in our celestial neighborhood, inexorably drawing in all matter. Closer objects are affected more strongly, with the closest whipping past the event horizon and disappearing from the observable universe. Farther objects are pulled in more slowly, but still inescapably. As they come closer to the disturbance, the gravitational field warping space exponentially, closer points are pulled away from trailing edges, potentially ripping entire planets apart. These are tidal forces. The same force that creates tides and waves in our ocean, as the moon pulls

Dynamic Security Assessment: Process and Functions

By Mike Rothman
As we wind down the year it’s time to return to forward-looking research, specifically a concept we know will be more important in 2017. As described in the first post of our Dynamic Security Assessment series, there are clear limitations to current security testing mechanisms. But before we start talking about solutions we should lay out the requirements for our vision of dynamic security assessment. Ongoing: Infrastructure is dynamic, so point-in-time testing cannot be sufficient. That’s one of the key issues with traditional vulnerability testing: a point-in-time assessment can be obsolete before the report hits your inbox. Current: Every

Incite 12/21/2016: To Incite

By Mike Rothman
In the process of wrapping up the year I realize the last Incite I wrote was in August. Damn. That’s a long respite. It’s in my todo list every Tuesday. And evidently I have dutifully rescheduled it for about 3 months now. I am one to analyze (and probably overanalyze) everything, so I need to figure out why I have resisted writing the Incite. I guess it makes sense to go back to 2007, when I started writing the Incite. My motivation was to build my first independent research business (Security Incite), and back then a newsletter was the way
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