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Evolving to Security Decision Support: Visibility is Job #1

By Mike Rothman
To demonstrate our mastery of the obvious, it’s not getting easier to detect attacks. Not that it was ever really easy, but at least you used to know what tactics adversaries used, and you had a general idea of where they would end up, because you knew where your important data was, and which (single) type of device normally accessed it: the PC. It’s hard to believe we now long for the days of early PCs and centralized data repositories. But that is not today’s world. You face professional adversaries (and possibly nation-states) who use agile methods

The Future of Security Operations: Embracing the Machines

By Mike Rothman
To state the obvious, traditional security operations is broken. Every organization faces more sophisticated attacks, the possibility of targeted adversaries, and far more complicated infrastructure; compounding the problem, we have fewer skilled resources to execute on security programs. Obviously it’s time to evolve security operations by leveraging technology to both accelerate human work and take care of rote, tedious tasks which don’t add value. So security orchestration and automation are terms you will hear pretty consistently from here on out. Some security practitioners resist the idea of automation, mostly because if done incorrectly the ramifications are severe and

The Future of Security Operations: Regaining Balance

By Mike Rothman
The first post in this series, Behind the 8 Ball, raised a number of key challenges practicing security in our current environment. These include continual advancement and innovation by attackers seeking new ways to compromise devices and exfiltrate data, increasing complexity of technology infrastructure, frequent changes to said infrastructure, and finally the systemic skills shortage which limits our resources available to handle all the challenges created by the other issues. Basically, practitioners are behind the 8-ball in getting their job done and protecting corporate data. As we discussed in that earlier post, thinking differently about security entails you changing things up

Endpoint Advanced Protection Buyer’s Guide: Top 10 Questions for Detection and Response

By Mike Rothman
There are plenty of obvious questions you could ask each endpoint security vendor. But they don’t really help you understand the nuances of their approach, so we decided to distill the selection criteria down to a few key points. We will provide both the questions and the reasons behind them. Q1: Where do you draw the line between prevention and EDR? The clear trend is towards an integrated advanced endpoint protection capability addressing prevention, detection, response, and hunting. That said, it may not be the right answer for any specific organization, depending on the adversaries they face and the

Endpoint Advanced Protection Buyer’s Guide: Key Technologies for Detection and Response

By Mike Rothman
Now let’s dig into some key EDR technologies which appear across all the use cases: detection, response, and hunting. Agent The agent is deployed to each monitored endpoint, so you be sensitive to its size and its performance hit on devices. A main complaint regarding older endpoint protection was performance impact on devices. The smaller the better, and the less performance impact the better (duh!), but just as important is agent deployability and maintainability. Full capture versus metadata: There are differing strong opinions on how much telemetry to capture and store from each device. Similar to the question of

Endpoint Advanced Protection Buyer’s Guide: Key Capabilities for Response and Hunting

By Mike Rothman
The next set of key Endpoint Detection and Response (EDR) capabilities we will discuss is focused on response and hunting. Response Response begins after the attack has happened. Basically, Pandora’s Box is open and an active adversary is on your endpoints, probably stealing your stuff. So you need to understand the depth of the attack, and to focus on containment and returning the environment to a known safe state as quickly as possible. Understand that detection and response are considered different use cases when evaluating endpoint security vendors, but you aren’t really going to buy detection without buying

Endpoint Advanced Protection Buyer’s Guide: Key Capabilities for Detection

By Mike Rothman
As we resume posting Endpoint Detection and Response (D/R) selection criteria, let’s start with a focus on the Detection use case. Before we get too far into capabilities, we should clear up some semantics about the word ‘detection’. Referring back to our timeline in Prevention Selection Criteria, detection takes place during execution. You could make the case that detection of malicious activity is what triggers blocking, and so a pre-requisite to attack prevention – without detection, how could you know what to prevent?. But that’s too confusing. For simplicity let’s just say prevention means blocking an attack

Endpoint Advanced Protection Buyer’s Guide: Detection and Response Use Cases

By Mike Rothman
As we continue documenting what you need to know to understand Endpoint Advanced Protection offerings, it’s time to delve into Detection and Response. Remember that before you are ready to pick anything, you need to understand the problem you are trying to solve. Detecting all endpoint attacks within microseconds and without false positives isn’t really achievable. You need to determine the key use cases most important to you, and make an honest assessment of your team and adversaries. Why is this introspection necessary? Nobody ever says they don’t want to detect active attacks and hunt for adversaries.

Endpoint Advanced Protection Buyer’s Guide: Top 10 Questions on Prevention

By Mike Rothman
There are plenty of obvious questions you could ask an endpoint security vendor. But most won’t really help you understand the nuances of their approach, so we decided to distill the selection criteria down to a couple of key points. We’ll provide not just the questions, but the rationale behind them. Q1 If your prevention capabilities rely on machine learning, how and how often are your machine learning models retrained? An explanation here should provide some perspective on the vendor’s approach to math and the ‘half-life’ of their models, which indicates how quickly they believe malware attack

The Future of Security Operations: Behind the 8 Ball

By Mike Rothman
As the velocity of technology infrastructure change continues to increase, it is putting serious stress on Security Operations (SecOps). This has forced security folks to face the fact that operations has never really been our forte. That’s a bit harsh, but denial never helps address serious problems. The case is fairly strong that most organizations are pretty bad at security operations. How many high-profile breaches could have been avoided if one of many alerts was acted upon? How many attacks were made possible by not having properly patched servers or infrastructure? How many successful compromises resulted from human error?
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