Blog

Talking Database Assessment with Imperva

By Adrian Lane
I will be presenting a webinar: “Understanding and Selecting a Database Assessment Solution” with Imperva this Wednesday, May 19th at 11am PST / 2pm EST. I’ll cover the deployment models, key features, and ways to differentiate assessment platforms. I’ll spend a little more time on applicability for compliance, as that is the key driver for adoption now, but cover other use cases as well. You can register and sign up for the webinar. As always, if you have questions you would like addressed, you can email me prior to the presentation.

FireStarter: Killing the Next Generation

By Mike Rothman
As a former marketing guy, I’m sensitive to meaningless descriptors that obfuscate the value a product brings to a customer. Seeing Larry Walsh’s piece on next generation firewalls versus UTM got my blood boiling because it’s such a meaningless argument. It’s time we slay the entire concept of ‘next generation’ anything. That’s right, I’m saying it. The concept of a next generation is a load of crap. The vendor community has taken to calling incremental iterations ‘next generation’ because they can’t think of a real reason customers should upgrade their gear. Maybe the

Friday Summary: May 14, 2010

By Adrian Lane
I was rummaging through the closet yesterday, when I came across some old notebooks from college. Yes, I am a pack rat. One of the books contained notes from Computer Science 110: Algorithm Design. Most of the coursework was looking for ways to make algorithms more efficient, and to select the right algorithm to get the job done. I remember spending weeks on sorting routines: bubble sort, merge sort, heap sort, sorts based upon the Fibonacci sequence, Quicksort, and a few others. All of which we ran against sample data sets; comparing performance; and collecting information on best case, median, and

Unintended Consequences of Consumerization

By Mike Rothman
The ripple effect, of how a small change creates a major exposure down the line, continues to amaze me. That’s why I enjoyed the NetworkWorld post on how the iPad brings a nasty surprise. The story is basically how the ability for iPads to connect to the corporate network exposed a pretty serious hole in one organization’s network defenses. Basically a minor change to the authentication mechanism for WiFi smart phones allowed unauthorized devices to connect to the corporate network. It’s an interesting read, but we really need to consider the issues with the story. First, clearly

SAP Buys Sybase

By Adrian Lane
I am sitting on the porch reading a Sybase ASE document on transparent database encryption, so it’s ironic that a few minutes ago I got word that SAP bought Sybase for $5.8 billion. SAP posted a press release. This announcement is right on the heels of their partnership announcement last March. It’s been my feeling for several years now that relational databases have been on a steady retreat back into the core of the enterprise, from whence they came. Smaller, modular, more agile repositories are in vogue for everything outside enterprise IT data centers. They are easier and more

We Have Ways of Making You ... Use a Password

By Adrian Lane
MSNBC has an interesting news item: a German court is ordering all wireless routers to have a password, or the owners will be fined if it is discovered that someone used their connection illegally. From the post: Internet users can be fined up to euro 100 ($126) if a third party takes advantage of their unprotected WLAN connection to illegally download music or other files, the Karlsruhe-based court said in its verdict. “Private users are obligated to check whether their wireless connection is adequately secured to the danger of unauthorized third parties abusing it to commit copyright violation,” the court said. OK,

Incite 5/12/2010: the Power of Unplugging

By Mike Rothman
I’m crappy at vacations. It usually takes me a few days to unwind and relax, and then I blink and it’s time to go home and get back into the mess of daily life. But it’s worse than that – even when I’m away, I tend to check email and wade through my blog posts and basically not really disconnect. So the guilt is always there. As opposed to enjoying what I’m doing, I’m worried about what I’m not doing and how much is piling up while I’m away. This has to stop.

FireStarter: Secure Development Lifecycle—You’re Doing It Wrong

By Adrian Lane
I wrote last Monday’s FireStarter on Process and Peer Pressure because there were a few things bothering me that I needed to get out of my system, but I saved a lot for later. I didn’t really intend to write this followup so soon, but I saw that Cisco announced their own Software Development Lifecycle. I wanted to make some statements on SDL later this year when I begin publishing more concrete Secure Software Development Lifecycle (SSDL in Securosis parlance, SDL for most organizations) guidelines, but Cisco’s announcement changes things. I worry that sheer inertia will prompt

Friday Summary: May 7, 2010

By Rich
Yesterday I finished up a presentation for the Secure360 Conference: “Putting the Fun in Dysfunctional – How the Security Industry Works, and Why It’s Your Fault”. This is a combination of a bunch of things I’ve been thinking about for a while, mostly focused on cognitive science and economics. Essentially, security makes a heck of a lot more sense once you start trying to understand why people make the decisions they do, which is a combination of their own internal workings and external forces. Since it’s very hard to change how people think (in terms of process, not

Help Build the Mother of All Data Security Surveys

By Rich
I spend a heck of a lot of time researching, writing, and speaking about data security. One area that’s been very disappointing is the quality of many of the surveys. Most either try to quantify losses (without using a verifiable loss model), measure general attitudes to inspire some BS hype press release, or assess some other fuzzy aspect you can spin any way you want. This bugs me, and it’s been on my to-do list to run a better survey myself. When a vendor (Imperva) proposed the same thing back at RSA (meaning we’d have funding) and
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