Blog

Analysis of Trustwave’s 2010 Breach Report

By Rich
Trustwave just released their latest breach (and penetration testing) report, and it’s chock full of metrics goodness. Like the Verizon Data Breach Investigations Report, it’s a summary of information based on their responses to real breaches, with a second section on results from their penetration tests. The breach section is the best part, and I already wrote about one lesson in a quick post on DLP. Here are a few more nuggets that stood out: It took an average of 156 days to detect a breach, and only 9% of victims detected the breach on their own – the rest were

What Do DLP and Condoms Have in Common?

By Rich
They both work a heck of a lot better if you use them ahead of time. I just finished reading the Trustwave Global Security Report, which summarizes their findings from incident response and penetration tests during 2009. In over 200 breach investigations, they only encountered one case where the bad guy encrypted the data during exfiltration. That’s right, only once. 1. The big uno. This makes it highly likely that a network DLP solution would have detected, if not prevented, the other 199+ breaches. Since I started covering DLP, one of the biggest criticisms has been that it can’t detect sensitive data

Database Security Fundamentals: Access & Authorization

By Adrian Lane
This is part 2 of the Database Security Fundamentals series. In part 1, I provided an overview. Here I will cover basic access and authorization issues. First, the basics: Reset Passwords: Absolutely the first basic step is to change all default passwords. If I need to break into a database, the very first thing I am going to try is to log into a known account with a default password. Simple, fast, and it rarely gets noticed. You would be surprised (okay, maybe not surprised, but definitely disturbed) at how often the default SA password is left in place. Public & Demonstration

Need Brains. User Brains

By Rich
As part of our support for the Open Web Application Security Project (OWASP), we participate in their survey program which runs quarterly polls on various application security issues. The idea is to survey a group of users to gain a better understanding of how they are managing or perceiving web application security. We also occasionally run our own surveys to support research projects, such as Project Quant. All these results are released free to the public, and if we’re running the survey ourself we also release the raw anonymized data. One of our ongoing problems is getting together a

Incite 2/2/2010: The Life of the Party

By Mike Rothman
Good Morning: I was at dinner over the weekend with a few buddies of mine, and one of my friends asked (again) which AV package is best for him. It seems a few of my friends know I do security stuff and inevitably that means when they do something stupid, I get the call. This guy’s wife contracted one of the various Facebook viruses about a month ago and his machine still wasn’t working correctly. Right, it was slow and sluggish and just didn’t seem like it used to be. I delivered the bad news that he

Network Security Fundamentals: Monitor Everything

By Mike Rothman
As we continue on our journey through the fundamentals of network security, the idea of network monitoring must be integral to any discussion. Why? Because we don’t know where the next attack is coming, so we need to get better at compressing the window between successful attack and detection, which then drives remediation activities. It’s a concept I coined back at Security Incite in 2006 called React Faster, which Rich subsequently improved upon by advocating Reacting Faster and Better. React Faster (and better) I’ve written extensively on the concept of React Faster, so here’s a quick description

You Have to Buy Data Security Tools

By Rich
When Mike was reviewing the latest Pragmatic Data Security post he nailed me on being too apologetic for telling people they need to spend money on data-security specific tools. (The line isn’t in the published post). Just so you don’t think Mike treats me any nicer in private than he does in public, here’s what he said: Don’t apologize for the fact that data discovery needs tools. It is what it is. They can be like almost everyone else and do nothing, or they can get some tools to do the job. Now helping to determine

Pragmatic Data Security: Discover

By Rich
In the Discovery phase we figure where the heck our sensitive information is, how it’s being used, and how well it’s protected. If performed manually, or with too broad an approach, Discovery can be quite difficult and time consuming. In the pragmatic approach we stick with a very narrow scope and leverage automation for greater efficiency. A mid-sized organization can see immediate benefits in a matter of weeks to months, and usually finish a comprehensive review (including all endpoints) within a year or less. Discover: The Process Before we get into the process, be aware that your job

FireStarter: Agile Development and Security

By Adrian Lane
I am a big fan of the Agile project development methodology, especially Agile with Scrum. I love the granularity and focus the approach requires. I love that at any given point in time you are working on the most important feature or function. I love the derivative value of communication and subtle form of peer pressure that Scrum meetings produce. I love that if mistakes are made you do not go too far in the wrong direction, resulting in higher productivity and few software projects that are total disasters. I think Agile is the biggest advancement in code development in

The Network Forensics (Full Packet Capture) Revival Tour

By Rich
I hate to admit that of all the various technology areas, I’m probably best known for my work covering DLP. What few people know is that I ‘fell’ into DLP, as one of my first analyst assignments at Gartner was network forensics. Yep – the good old fashioned “network VCRs” as we liked to call them in those pre-TiVo days. My assessment at the time was that network forensics tools like Niksun, Infinistream, and Silent Runner were interesting, but really only viable in certain niche organizations. These vendors usually had a couple of really big clients, but were never able
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