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Data Discovery and Databases

By Adrian Lane
I periodically write for Dark Reading, contributing to their Database Security blog. Today I posted What Data Discovery Tools Really Do, introducing how data discovery works within relational database environments. As is the case with many of the posts I write for them, I try not to use the word ‘database’ to preface every description, as it gets repetitive. But sometimes that context is really important. Ben Tomhave was kind enough to let me know that the post was referenced on the eDiscovery and Digital evidence mailing list. One comment there was, “One recurring issue has been this: If enterprise

Pragmatic Data Security: Groundwork

By Rich
Back in Part 1 of our series on Pragmatic Data Security, we covered some guiding concepts. Before we actually dig in, there’s some more groundwork we need to cover. There are two important fundamentals that provide context for the rest of the process. The Data Breach Triangle In May of 2009 I published a piece on the Data Breach Triangle, which is based on the fire triangle every Boy Scout and firefighter is intimately familiar with. For a fire to burn you need fuel, oxygen, and heat – take any single element away and there’s no combustion. Extending that idea: to

The Rights Management Dilemma

By Rich
Over the past few months I’ve seen a major uptick in the number of user inquiries I’m taking on enterprise digital rights management (or enterprise rights management, but I hate that term). Having covered EDRM for something like 8 years or so now, I’m only slightly surprised. I wouldn’t say there’s a new massive groundswell of sudden desperate motivation to protect corporate intellectual assets. Rather, it seems like a string of knee-jerk reactions related to specific events. What concerns me is that I’ve noticed two consistent trends throughout these discussions: EDRM is being mandated from

Incite 1/20/2010 - Thanks Mr. Internet

By Mike Rothman
Good Morning: I love the Internet. In fact, I can’t imagine how I got anything done before it was there at all times to help. Two examples illustrate my point. On Monday, I went to lunch with the family at Fuddrucker’s, since they had off from school. They say a big poster of Elvis with a title “The King” underneath. They had heard of Elvis, but didn’t know much about him. The Boss and I were debating how old Elvis was when he had that unfortunate toilet incident. I whipped out the iPhone, took a quick peek

FireStarter: Security Endangered Species List

By Mike Rothman
Our weekly research meeting started with an optimistic plea from yours truly. Will 2010 finally be the year the signature dies? I mean, come on now, we all know endpoint AV using only signatures is an accident waiting to happen. And everywhere else signatures are used (predominantly IPS & anti-spam) those technologies are heavily supplemented with additional behavioral and heuristic techniques to improve detection. But the team thought that idea was too restrictive, and largely irrelevant because regardless of the technology used, the vendors adapt their products to keep up with the attacks. Yes, that was my idea of biting sarcasm.

ReputationDefender

By David J. Meier
We’ve all heard the stories: employee gets upset, says something about their boss online, boss sees it, and BAM, fired. As information continues to stick around, people find it increasingly beneficial to think before launching a raging tweet. Here lies the opportunity: what if I can pay someone to gather that information and potentially get rid of it? Enter ReputationDefender. Their business consists of three key ideas: Search: Through search ReputationDefender will find and present information about you so it’s easy to understand. Destroy: Remove (for a per-incident fee) information that you don’t care to have strewn

Friday Summary: January 14, 2010

By Rich
As I sit here writing this, scenes of utter devastation play on the television in the background. It’s hard to keep perspective in situations like this. Most of us are in our homes, with our families, with little we can do other than donate some money as we carry on with our lives. The scale of destruction is so massive that even those of us who have worked in disasters can barely comprehend its enormity. Possibly 45-55,000 dead, which is enough bodies to fill a small to medium sized college football stadium. 3 million homeless, and what may be one

Management by Complaint

By Rich
In Mike’s post this morning on network security he made the outlandish suggestion that rather than trying to fix your firewall rules, you could just block everything and wait for the calls to figure out what really needs to be open. I made the exact same recommendation at the SANS data security event I was at earlier this week, albeit about blocking access to files with sensitive content. I call this “management by complaint”, and it’s a pretty darn effective tactic. Many times in security we’re called in to fix something after the fact, or in the

Low Hanging Fruit: Network Security

By Mike Rothman
During my first two weeks at Securosis, I’ve gotten soundly thrashed for being too “touchy-feely.” You know, talking about how you need to get your mindset right and set the right priorities for success in 2010. So I figure I’ll get down in the weeds a bit and highlight a couple of tactics that anyone can use to ensure their existing equipment is optimized. I’ve got a couple main patches in my coverage area, including network and endpoint security, as well as security management. So over the next few days I’ll highlight some quick things in each

Pragmatic Data Security- Introduction

By Rich
Over the past 7 years or so I’ve talked with thousands of IT professionals working on various types of data security projects. If I were forced to pull out one single thread from all those discussions it would have to be the sheer intimidating potential of many of these projects. While there are plenty of self-constrained projects, in many cases the security folks are tasked with implementing technologies or changes that involve monitoring or managing on a pretty broad scale. That’s just the nature of data security – unless the information you’re trying to protect is already in isolated
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