Blog

REMINDER: Register for the Disaster Recovery Breakfast

By Mike Rothman
If you are going to be in San Francisco next week. Yes, next week. How the hell is the RSA Conference next week? Anyhow, don’t forget to swing by the Disaster Recovery Breakfast and say hello Thursday morning. Our friends from Kulesa Faul, CHEN PR, LaunchTech, and CyberEdge Group will be there. And hopefully Rich will remember his pants, this time.

Securing SAP Clouds [New Paper]

By Adrian Lane
Use of cloud services is common in IT. Gmail, Twitter, and Dropbox are ubiquitous; as are business applications like Salesforce, ServiceNow, and QuickBooks. But along with the basic service, customers are outsourcing much of application security. As more firms move critical back-office components such as SAP Hana to public platform and infrastructure services, those vendors are taking on much more security responsibility. It is far from clear how to assemble a security strategy for complex a application such as SAP Hana, or how to adapt existing security controls to an unfamiliar environment with only partial control. We have received a

Security Analytics Team of Rivals: Introduction [New Series]

By Mike Rothman
Security monitoring has been a foundational element of most every security program for over a decade. The initial driver for separate security monitoring infrastructure was the overwhelming amount of alerts flooding out of intrusion detection devices, which required some level of correlation to determine which mattered. Soon after, compliance mandates (primarily PCI-DSS) emerged as a forcing function, providing a clear requirement for log aggregation – which SIEM already did. As the primary security monitoring technology, SIEM became entrenched for alert reduction and compliance reporting. But everything changes, and the requirements for security monitoring have evolved. Attacks have become much more sophisticated,

Tidal Forces: Software as a Service Is the New Back Office

By Rich
TL;DR: SaaS enables Zero Trust networks with pervasive encryption and access. Box vendors lose once again. It no longer makes sense to run your own mail server in your data center. Or file servers. Or a very long list of enterprise applications. Unless you are on a very very short list of organizations. Running enterprise applications in an enterprise data center is simply an anachronism in progress. A quick peek at the balance sheets of the top tier Software as a Service providers shows the transition to SaaS continues unabated. Buying and maintaining enterprise applications, such as mail servers,

Dynamic Security Assessment: In Action

By Mike Rothman
In the first two posts of this Dynamic Security Assessment series, we delved into the limitations of security testing and then presented the process and key functions you need to implement it. To illuminate the concepts and make things a bit more tangible, let’s consider a plausible scenario involving a large financial services enterprise with hundreds of locations. Our organization has a global headquarters on the West Coast of the US, and 4 regional headquarters across the globe. Each region has a data center and IT operations folks to run things. The security team is centralized under a global CISO,

Securing SAP Clouds: Application Security

By Adrian Lane
This post will discuss the foundational elements of an application security program for SAP HCP deployments. Without direct responsibility for management of hardware and physical networks you lose the traditional security data capture points for traffic analysis and firewall technologies. The net result is that, whether on PaaS or IaaS, your application security program becomes more important than ever as what you have control over. Yes, SAP provides some network monitoring and DDoS services, but your options are are limited, they don’t share much data, and what they monitor is not tailored to your applications or requirements. Any application

Securing SAP Clouds: Architecture and Operations

By Adrian Lane
This post will discuss several keys differences in application architecture and operations – with a direct impact on security – which you need to reconsider when migrating to cloud services. These are the areas which make operations easier and security better. As companies move large business-critical applications to the cloud, they typically do it backwards. Most people we speak with, to start getting familiar with the cloud, opt for cheap storage. Once a toe is in the water they place some development, testing, and failover servers in the cloud to backstop on-premise systems. These ar less critical than production servers, where firms

Tidal Forces: Endpoints Are Different—More Secure, and Less Open

By Rich
This is the second post in the Tidal Forces series. The introduction is available.. Computers aren’t computers any more. Call it a personal computer. A laptop, desktop, workstation, PC, or Mac. Whatever configuration we’re dealing with, and whatever we call it, much of the practice of information security focuses on keeping the devices we place in our users’ hands safe. They are the boon and bane of information technology – forcing us to find a delicate balance between safety, security, compliance, and productivity. Lock them down too much and people can’t get things done – they will find an

Secure Networking in the Cloud Age: Use Cases

By Mike Rothman
As we wrap up our series on secure networking in the cloud era, we have covered the requirements and migration considerations for this new network architecture – highlighting increased flexibility for configuration, scaling, and security services. In a technology environment which can change as quickly as a developer hitting ‘commit’ for a new feature, infrastructure needs to keep pace, and that is not something most enterprises can or should build themselves. One of the cornerstones of this approach to building networks is considering the specific requirements of the site, users, and applications, when deciding whether to buy or build the underlying

Network Security in the Cloud Age: Requirements and Migration

By Mike Rothman
As we noted in our introductory post for this Network Security in the Cloud Age series, everything changes, and technology is undergoing the most radical change and disruption since… well, ever. We’re not kidding – check out our Tidal Forces post for the rundown. This disruption will have significant ramifications for how we build and manage networks. Let’s work through the requirements for this network of the future, and then provide some perspective on how you can and should migrate to the new network architecture. At the highest level, the main distinction in building networks in the Cloud Age
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