Blog

Cracking the Confusion: Encryption and Tokenization for Data Centers, Servers, and Applications

By Rich

This is the first post in a new series. If you want to track it through the entire editing process, you can follow it and contribute on GitHub.

The New Age of Encryption

Data encryption has long been part of the information security arsenal. From passwords, to files, to databases, we rely on encryption to protect our data in storage and on the move. It’s a foundational element in any security professional’s education. But despite its long history and deep value, adoption inside data centers and applications has been relatively – even surprisingly – low.

Today we see encryption growing in the data center at an accelerating rate, due to a confluence of reasons. A trite way to describe it is “compliance, cloud, and covert affairs”. Organizations need to keep auditors off their backs; keep control over data in the cloud; and stop the flood of data breaches, state-sponsored espionage, and government snooping (even their own).

And thanks to increasing demand, there is a growing range of options, as vendors and even free and Open Source tools address the opportunity. We have never had more choice, but with choices comes complexity; and outside of your friendly local sales representative, guidance can be hard to come by.

For example, given a single application collecting an account number from each customer, you could encrypt it in any of several different places: the application, the database, or storage – or use tokenization instead. The data is encrypted (or substituted), but each place you might encrypt raises different concerns. What threats are you protecting against? What is the performance overhead? How are keys managed? Does it meet compliance requirements?

This paper cuts through the confusion to help you pick the best encryption options for your projects. In case you couldn’t guess from the title, our focus is on encrypting in the data center – applications, servers, databases, and storage. Heck, we will even cover cloud computing (IaaS: Infrastructure as a Service), although we covered that in depth in another paper. We will also cover tokenization and its relationship with encryption.

We won’t cover encryption algorithms, cipher modes, or product comparisons. We will cover different high-level options and technologies, such as when to encrypt in the database vs. in the application, and what kinds of data are best suited for tokenization. We will also cover key management, some essential platform features, and how to tie it all together.

Understanding Encryption Systems

When most security professionals first learn about encryption the focus is on keys, algorithms, and modes. We learn the difference between symmetric and asymmetric and spend a lot of time talking about Bob and Alice.

Once you start working in the real world your focus needs to change. The fundamentals are still important but now you need to put them into practice as you implement encryption systems – the combination of technologies that actually protects data. Even the strongest crypto algorithm is worthless if the system around it is full of flaws.

Before we go into specific scenarios let’s review the basic concepts behind building encryption systems because this becomes the basis for decisions on which encryption options to go use.

The Three Components of a Data Encryption System

When encrypting data, especially in applications and data centers, knowing how and where to place these pieces is incredibly important, and mistakes here are one of the most common causes of failure. We use all our data at some point, and understanding where the exposure points are, where the encryption components reside, and how they tie together, all determine how much actual security you end up with.

Three major components define the overall structure of an encryption system.

  • The data: The object or objects to encrypt. It might seem silly to break this out, but the security and complexity of the system depend on the nature of the payload, as well as where it is located or collected.
  • The encryption engine: This component handles actual encryption (and decryption) operations.
  • The key manager: This handles keys and passes them to the encryption engine.

In a basic encryption system all three components are likely located on the same system. As an example take personal full disk encryption (the built-in tools you might use on your home Windows PC or Mac): the encryption key, data, and engine are all stored and used on the same hardware. Lose that hardware and you lose the key and data – and the engine, but that isn’t normally relevant. (Neither is the key, usually, because it is protected with another key, or passphrase, that is not stored on the system – but if the system is lost while running, with the key in memory, that becomes a problem). For data centers these major components are likely to reside on different systems, increasing complexity and security concerns over how the pieces work together.

No Related Posts

If you like to leave comments, and aren’t a spammer, register for the site and email us at info@securosis.com and we’ll turn off moderation for your account.