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Firestarter: It’s a GDPR Thing

By Rich
Mike and Rich discuss the ugly reality that GDPR really is a thing. Not that privacy or even GDPR are bad (we’re all in favor), but they do require extra work on our part to ensure that policies are in place, audits are performed, and pesky data isn’t left lying around in log files unexpectedly. Watch or listen:

Scaling Network Security: The Scaled Network Security Architecture

By Mike Rothman
After considering the challenges of existing network security architectures (RIP Moat) we laid out a number of requirements for the new network security. This includes the needs for scale, intelligence, and flexibility. That’s all well and good, but how do you get there? We’ll wrap up this series by discussing a couple key architectural constructs which will influence how you build your future network security architecture. But before we go into specifics, let’s wrap a few caveats around the architecture. Not everything works for every organization. There may be cultural impediments to some of the ideas we

Scaling Network Security: The New Network Security Requirements

By Mike Rothman
In our last post we bid adieu to The Moat, given the encapsulation of almost everything into standard web protocols and the movement of critical data to an expanding set of cloud services. Additionally, the insatiable demand for bandwidth further complicates how network security scales. So it’s time to reframe the requirements of the new network security. Basically, as we rethink network security, what do we need it to do? Scale Networks have grown exponentially over the past decade. With 100gbps networks commonplace and the need to inspect traffic at wire speed, let’s just say scale is towards

Scaling Network Security: RIP, the Moat

By Mike Rothman
The young people today laugh at folks with a couple decades of experience when they rue about the good old days, when your network was snaked along the floors of your office (shout out for Thicknet!), and trusted users were on the corporate network, and untrusted users were not. Suffice it to say the past 25 years have seen some rapid changes to technology infrastructure. First of all, in a lot of cases, there aren’t even any wires. That’s kind of a shocking concept to a former network admin who fixed a majority of problems by swapping out patch

SecMon State of the Union: The Buying Process

By Mike Rothman
Now that you’ve revisited your important use cases, and derived a set of security monitoring requirements, it’s time to find the right fit among the dozens of alternatives. To wrap up this series we will bring you through a reasonably structured process to narrow down your short list, and then testing the surviving products. Once you’ve chosen the technical winner, you need to make the business side of things work – and it turns out the technical winner is not always the solution you end up buying. The first rule of buying anything is that you are in

SecMon State of the Union: Refreshing Requirements

By Mike Rothman
Now that you understand the use cases for security monitoring, our next step is to translate them into requirements for your strategic security monitoring platform. In other words, now that you have an idea of the problem(s) you need to solve, what capabilities do you need to address them? Part of that discussion is inevitably about what you don’t get from your existing security monitoring approach – this research wouldn’t be very interesting if your existing tools were all peachy. Visibility We made the case that Visibility Is Job #1 in our Security Decision Support series. Maintaining sufficient visibility

SecMon State of the Union: Focus on Use Cases

By Mike Rothman
When we revisited the Security Monitoring Team of Rivals it became obvious that the overlap between SIEM and security analytics has passed a point of no return. So with a Civil War brewing our key goal is to determine what will be your strategic platform for security monitoring. This requires you to shut out the noise of fancy analytics and colorful visualizations, and focus on the problem you are trying to solve now, with an eye to how it will evolve in the future. That means getting back to use cases. The cases for security monitoring tend to fall into

The Security Profession Needs to Adopt Just Culture

By Rich
Yesterday Twitter revealed they had accidentally stored plain-text passwords in some log files. There was no indication the data was accessed and users were warned to update their passwords. There was no known breach, but Twitter went public anyway, and was excoriated in the press and… on Twitter. This is a problem for our profession and industry. We get locked into a cycle where any public disclosure of a breach or security mistake results in: People ripping the organization apart on social media without knowing the facts. Vendors issuing press releases claiming their product would have prevented the issue, without

SecMon State of the Union: Revisiting the Team of Rivals

By Mike Rothman
Things change. That’s the only certainty in technology today, and certainly in security. Back when we wrote Security Analytics Team of Rivals, SIEM and Security Analytics offerings were different and did not really overlap. It was more about how can they coexist, instead of choosing one over the other. But nowadays the overlap is significant, so you need existing SIEM players basically bundling in security analytics capabilities and security analytics players positioning their products as next-generation SIEM. As per usual, customers are caught in the middle, trying to figure out what is truth and what is marketing puffery. So

Firestarter: The RSA 2018 Episode

By Rich
This week Rich, Mike, and Adrian talk about what they expect to see at the RSA Security Conference, and if it really means anything. As we do in most of our RSA Conference related discussions the focus is less on what to see and more on what industry trends we can tease out, and the potential impact on the regular security practitioner. For example, what happens when blockchain and GDPR collide? Do security vendors finally understand cloud? What kind of impact does DevOps have on the security market? Plus we list where you can find us, and, as always, don
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