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If Not Java, What?

You have probably noticed some security issues with Java lately. Some vendors – including Apple – are blocking Java in order to close known and unforeseen security problems. And the claim that open source Java frameworks pose a business risk. But through this latest flame war, I have not seen an answer to the basic question:

If not Java, what?

If you’re going to get Java out of the enterprise to address a security risk and replace it with something else, what would you select? Do we really have evidence that platforms like Ruby, JSON, or Node.js are more secure? Clojure and Scala rely on a JVM and the same frameworks as Java, so they cannot be more secure than the shared JVM. And remember, Java also does a few things very well, which is why it has become so popular over the last 15 years. It has a very good object model. Cross-platform compatibility. Easy to learn syntax. Extensible. Tons of tools. Easy integration. All reasons why I think we have proven C++ and C# are not replacements.

I really don’t have an answer for this question. But I think I can say, in the same way that we can’t go back and rewrite all insecure code because there is is not enough time or money to do it, we are not going to throw Java out because it’s insecure. We can make a decision to block it from the browser, but that does not address the myriad ways Java is used in the enterprise. In fact I don’t even see an alternative that would enable us to begin migrating off.

—Adrian Lane

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By Max  on  02/04  at  12:08 PM

Most valuable uses of java (including clojure and scala) use it on the server side, which isn’t affected by sandbox escapes as the privilege model often doesn’t rely on the JVM for security. Java in the browser does and that’s why it must go.
HTML5 is a great replacement for java applets.

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