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What You *Really* Need to Know about Oracle Database Firewall

By Rich

Nothing amuses me more than some nice vendor-on-vendor smackdown action. Well, plenty of things amuse me more, especially Big Bang Theory and cats on YouTube, but the vendor thing is still moderately high on my list.

So I quite enjoyed this Dark Reading article on the release of the Oracle Database Firewall. But perhaps a little outside perspective will help. Here are the important bits:

  1. As mentioned in the article, this is the first Secerno product release since their acquisition.
  2. Despite what Oracle calls it, this is a Database Activity Monitoring product at its core. Just one with more of a security focus than audit/compliance, and based on network monitoring (it lacks local activity monitoring, which is why it’s weaker for compliance). Many other DAM products can block, and Secerno can monitor. I always thought it was an interesting product.
  3. Most DAM products include network monitoring as an option. The real difference with Secerno is that they focused far more on the security side of the market, even though historically that segment is much smaller than the audit/monitoring/compliance side. So Oracle has more focus on blocking, and less on capturing and storing all activity.
  4. It is not a substitute for Database Activity Monitoring products, nor is it “better” as Oracle claims. Because it is a form of DAM, but – as mentioned by competitors in the article – you still need multiple local monitoring techniques to handle direct access. Network monitoring alone isn’t enough. I’m sure Oracle Services will be more than happy to connect Secerno and Oracle Audit Vault to do this for you.
  5. Secerno basically whitelists queries (automatically) and can block unexpected activity. This appears to be pretty effective for database attacks, although I haven’t talked to any pen testers who have gone up against it. (They do also blacklist, but the whitelist is the main secret sauce).
  6. Secerno had the F5 partnership before the Oracle acquisition. It allowed you to set WAF rules based on something detected in the database (e.g., block a signature or host IP). I’m not sure if they have expanded this post-acquisition. Imperva is the only other vendor that I know of to integrate DAM/WAF.
  7. Oracle generally believes that if you don’t use their products your are either a certified idiot or criminally negligent. Neither is true, and while this is a good product I still recommend you look at all the major competitors to see what fits you best. Ignore the marketing claims.
  8. Odds are your DBA will buy this when you aren’t looking, as part of some bundle deal. If you think you need DAM for security, compliance, or both… start an assessment process or talk to them before you get a call one day to start handling incidents.

In other words: a good product with advantages and disadvantages, just like anything else. More security than compliance, but like many DAM tools it offers some of both. Ignore the hype, figure out your needs, and evaluate to figure out which tool fits best. You aren’t a bad person if you don’t buy Oracle, no matter what your sales rep tells your CIO.

And seriously – watch out for the deal bundling. If you haven’t learned anything from us about database security by now, hopefully you at least realize that DBAs and security don’t always talk as much as they should (the same goes for Guardium/IBM). If you need to be involved in any database security, start talking to the DBAs now, before it’s too late.

BTW, not to toot our own horns, but we sorta nailed it in our original take on the acquisition. Next we will see their WAF messaging. And we have some details of how Secerno works.

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